Andreas Molgaard
2005/7

11 ways to survive

Can extreme and radical thinking and ideas work as a design method? Can it change the debate?

Planning for the future is only relatively new in human history. More recently, we have developed sophisticated strategies and tools to help us predict human, scientific and technological discourse. It has enabled us to expand the scope in much greater detail, reaching down to the atomic scale and further into the past. Many are now aware of that there is likely to be a future without us...

In response to the doomsday fixation driving current scientific and environmental research, I listed “11 ways to survive” into the next century. Like worst case scenarios, the 11 ways to Survive are of extreme proportions and designed as a probes into society’s value system by expanding our imagination of the possible and (un)desirable in the rapidly changing environment ahead.
As an insurance policy, a last resort of political, economical, existential or technological extremes, the list suggests a choice and the need for priority of the most sober kind.

I’m inspired by the ways that “Worst-case Scenario” thinking and planning influence the choices we make and how this affects people and politicians in a practical sense and beyond. Ironically, when things fail, whether they are technologies, systems or programs, they illuminate in very productive ways in regards to design.





OTHER PROJECTS
Leave no one behind
Post Life Existence?
The Human Footprint Legislation



11 Ways To Survive
11 Ways To Survive
Extreme Design lab. Workshop at the V&A
Extreme Design lab. Workshop at the V&A
"Everything Should Be Ok". Project Documentation Book. Covering "Risk Perception" and workshop collaboration with V&A and RCA ReachOut
"Everything Should Be Ok". Project Documentation Book. Covering "Risk Perception" and workshop collaboration with V&A and RCA ReachOut
High Risk Communities project flyer, Digital Collage
High Risk Communities project flyer, Digital Collage